04.07.2018

Simon Šerc - Bora scura

Pharmafabrik / Sonospace, 2018

Sigic

Simon Šerc - Bora scura

Pharmafabrik / Sonospace, 2018

Simon Šerc - Bora scura

The musician and sound artist Simon Šerc released his album Bora Scura, featuring 10 recordings from the field, which capture the soundscape of the Bora wind in Ajdovščina. The album was presented on specialised radio stations of the WFMU community in New York, on Resonance.fm in London and on a radio station in Sydney. The Wire commended its sound quality and ranked the album among the most interesting productions of 2018. 

The listener hears various surprising, unpredictable, sometimes ominous as well as grandiose sounds, and is quickly submerged in a metaphysical or mystical experience. On this recording, Bora communicates with us through its sound, perhaps in the same manner as it did with the French poet Lautréamont. 

The 72-minute CD album features songs with English titles: Cyclon, Jet, Stress, Corridor, Climax, Pressure, Gust, Flux, String and Eject, which  indicate even before listening how the album will progress. The tracks flow naturally from one composition into another and form a coherent whole. The listener will find himself within a hurricane together with different winds and their soundscapes. Ringing of bells in a church tower, a train travelling in the distance, a dog's barking, clanging of a metal door, the shaking of window shutters, rustling of water, all these sounds offer a contrast to the sound of the wind, though all are drowned out by the aggressive Bora – a symbol of the identity of the Vipava Valley, where the wind has shaped the people's traditions and architecutre.

Spine-chilling whistling sounds of the Bora remind us of its power and the influence it had on our history. A particular historical event in the 4th century was affected by the Bora wind, which turned the arrows, mid-flight, back to the soldiers that shot them, thus defining the Battle of the Frigidus between the army of the Eastern Emperor Theodosius I and the army of Western Roman ruler Eugenius. Historians place the battle in the Vipava valley precisely because of the many ancient reports, which mention the Bora as the decisive factor in the outcome of the battle.